HALO Bassinest swivel sleeper Hospital Series

Enhances the postpartum rooming-in experience to promote safe sleep practices, family-centered care, and bonding.

Peace of mind is built right into the design

The HALO® Bassinest® swivel sleeper Hospital Series introduces a new level of care that brings newborns closer than ever to their caregivers. Its innovative design with 360° rotation enhances postpartum rooming-in practices, helping moms nurture and bond with their babies while enabling safe sleep practices from day one.

Patient outcomes

Patient benefits

  • Closer care

    Newborns need a loving touch. Early bonding is a vital process critical to both the parent and child’s healthy growth and development.1 The HALO Bassinest offers a new way to enable a baby-friendly, family-centered care model while supporting bonding.

    • Clear bedside walls provide visibility to her baby, so mom can rest while making eye contact that is key to bonding
    • 360° rotation allows mothers to bring baby close while still being on a separate sleep surface, making it easier for tired moms who need a break from skin-to-skin contact but want to keep baby close
  • Breastfeeding rates

    Only 32% of mothers achieved their intended exclusive breastfeeding duration.2 Current breastfeeding recommendations suggest the practice of rooming-in to allow mothers and infants to remain together. The bassinest can be brought directly above the moms’ laps to enable safe transfer after breastfeeding to support your care model of rooming-in with the goal of improved breastfeeding rates.
  • Gentle recovery

    Recovery from surgery can make any movement painful and difficult, and nearly one-third of moms in the U.S. have a cesarean section birth. The HALO Bassinest provides the flexibility needed to help recovering moms care for their babies while healing.

    • Convenient storage options, so mom can tend to her baby while in bed
    • Adjustable height makes it easier to avoid having to bend over or lift, which causes strain on mom’s incisions
    • 360° rotation and the 180° pivot allows easy positioning without the need to twist or stretch while mom is reaching for her baby

HALO Bassinest Overview

Operational outcomes

Clinical benefits

  • Safe sleep

    While rooming-in practices have a number of benefits for mom and baby, it can also present a number of safety concerns. The HALO Bassinest’s all-in-one thoughtful design was made with safety in mind — for families and care professionals alike. It’s flexible, 360° design offers mom the ability to position her baby in a way that feels most natural to her while keeping physical and eye contact for close, but separate sleep spaces.

    • Robust non-tipping design for up to 75 lbs.
    • Retractable wall with locks designed to help reduce accidents associated with rooming-in.
    • Firm mattress with a fitted sheet as recommended by APP helps reduce the risk of SIDS.3
  • Confident care

    Rooming-in practices can be daunting when you consider the risks involved, but the HALO Bassinest helps minimize those risks, allowing you the flexibility to give more confident patient care.
    • Fatigued mother: Bassinet comes directly over mom to allow for safe placement
    • Co-bedding: Close but separate sleep spaces
    • Adjustable height (even down to couch level): All visitors can safely welcome baby to avoid drop hazards.

Supporting materials

HALO Bassinest brochure

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HALO Bassinest spec sheet

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HALO Bassinest Case Study

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Related products

Barker et al., Int J Nurs Clin Pract 2017, 4: 229 https://doi.org/10.15344/2394-4978/2017/229

Baby-Friendly Hospital Practices and Meeting Exclusive Breastfeeding Intention Cria G. Perrine, Kelley S. Scanlon, Ruowei Li, Erika Odom and Laurence M. Grummer-Strawn Pediatrics 2012;130;54 DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-3633 originally published online June 4, 2012

SIDS and Other Sleep-related Infant Deaths: Updated 2016 Recommendations for a Safe Infant Sleeping Environment TASK FORCE ON SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME Pediatrics 2016;138; DOI:10.1542/peds.2016-2938 originally published online October 24, 2016